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Work Packages 2 - Booklet with intergenerational activities including best practices applied in partner countries

Case Studies

Case studies are related to educators’ and seniors’ experiences. Below you can find case studies from each partner country (Poland, Cyprus, Hungary, The Netherlands, Spain and Greece).

Case studies in Poland

Short bio of a facilitator (incl. experience in work with seniors and seniority as a facilitator):

Monika Kamieńska – has been working in UoTA for 5 years, conducting workshops and trainings for seniors within EU programmes, incl. proprietary courses for University of Economics and Humanities. Tight cooperation with spokesman for senior citizens at the presidential office. Has been organising intergenerational events addressed to seniors, i.a. senioralia and conferences for older people. Has been conducting author’s lectures for seniors from the Lodz voivodeship. The author of the publication ”Srebrne tabu. Miłość, przyjaźń i seks w dojrzałym wieku” [Silver taboo. (Making) Love and friendship at mature age] issued by the Lodz University.

Short bio of a senior:

Magdalena Bednarek started to work with seniors in 2015, implementing the “Social Activation of Elderly People” [Aktywizacja Społeczna Osób Starszych]. Has been conducting various activities concerning i.a.: self-development, soft skills development or leading debates. All activities were planned and conducted according to the proprietary program/ curriculum.

Case studies in Poland

Short bio of a facilitator (incl. experience in work with seniors and seniority as a facilitator):

Ewa Żochowska – painter, visual artist (collage, graphics, photography, installations, performance) and designer (graphics, interior design, murals and wall paintings). Graduate of the Academy of Fine Arts in Lodz (2002). Together with Natalia Anna Kalisz, she co-founded the brands Porąbane Meble and RZUĆ-MNIE-NA-ŚCIANA. President of the Art Yarn Foundation, cultural animator and organizer of art workshops and cultural events.

Master of combining opposites and discovering the other bottom. She is a volcano of ideas and can make something out of nothing. She will listen to any story. He loves the noise of the urban jungle and the silence before the storm. She prefers cats to dogs because she only walks her own paths. At night she hunts for new inspirations, during the day she likes to bask in the sun. She has initiated many projects for children and seniors such as:
POZA CZASEM – ARTISTIC RELAXATION ZONE FOR SENIORS // integration and art workshops with the participation of young people from the Youth Sociotherapy Center No. 3 in Lodz // PLACE: Dom Dziennego Pobytu dla Seniorów at 30 Grota Roweckiego Street, JESIENNE RÓŻE // integration and art project in retro style for seniors and their families // creative workshops // masked ball //. PLACE: View House of Culture in Lodz.

Short bio of a senior:

Dorota Grzegorczyk – MA in classical philology, pedagogue, educator. For over 25 years an instructor at the Balucki Cultural Center / Municipal Zone of Culture in Lodz. Entertainer of concerts, special events , outdoor events, coordinator of the The Local Government University of the Third Age (SUIIIW), Tutor of SUIIIW Alumni and Supporters Club. Organizer of poetry evenings and meetings with authors. Trainer of the Integron Plus Foundation (trainings – online journalism, web safety, graphic design). Lecturer at the Social Academy of Sciences

Case studies in Cyprus

Short bio of a facilitator (incl. experience in work with seniors and seniority as a facilitator):

Stelios Stylianou is Project Manager at Emphasys since 2028 and adult educator. I have a background in psychology, so I have also worked with seniors when I was living in the UK but under different circumstances.

Short bio of a senior:

Mrs. Maroula used to be an educator on kindergarten and primary schools and she has also been a writer of children’s literature

Case studies in Hungary

Short bio of a facilitator (incl. experience in work with seniors and seniority as a facilitator):

Szilvia Csirmaz brought the senior joy dance to Hungary in 2017, she is the referent of the senior pleasure dance in Hungary and the only one who can train instructors. She completed a senior dance instructor course in Austria, and the Austrian association is helping her to spread this movement in Hungary. The first training started back in September 2017, and now there are currently 200-230 trainers all over Hungary. There are groups almost everywhere in the big cities. Ms Csirmaz also in the senior age, which help her to understand the needs of the target groups.

Short bio of a senior:

Varga Izabella (72). She is a retired officer in a big international insurance company. She has 3 child and 8 grand children. She joined the programme for 3 years.

Case studies in The Netherlands

Short bio of a facilitator (incl. experience in work with seniors and seniority as a facilitator):

I am working in The Hague together with the municipality and The Hague University of Applied Sciences on the different programs that support the implementation of projects and social initiatives that continuously add to our ‘Age Friendly’ city.

Short bio of a senior:

Dirk, is a Dutch national, who used to work in a multinational company and now is already retired since recently.

Case studies in Spain

Short bio of a facilitator (incl. experience in work with seniors and seniority as a facilitator):

Jesús Lerín is a researcher and a lecturer in University from 2010 working in UCLM, he have a background in Laws, he live in Madrid, but he is from Cuenca, he is here once a week when he use to work with seniors. He is a professor of International Law and he is also work in a foundation at the Yehudi  Foundation. He is also teach in Programa Universitario “José Saramago” 50 plus.

Short bio of a senior:

I am Angelines, I’m going to be 81 years old. I am the eldest of 8 siblings. And I could never go to school. But I don’t have any trauma, because I have always had many concerns. My father was a teacher and when he gave lessons to others, I listened to them. As I liked reading a lot, I made a lot of progress and there were times when I answered questions and my father would say to me: it’s not you I asked. Later, when I was 20, I emigrated. I went to Switzerland, I had to learn the language, and I went to work in what the Swiss didn’t want to do. That was the spinning mills, i.e. the cotton bales arrived and were made into yarn to be sent to the looms.
But I felt very well because I was in a residence where we were 122 girls, 110 Italian and 12 Spanish, and I integrated very well.
It was a residence for nuns. Although the Spanish women who went there were all adults, we didn’t have any free time. Because the Italian girls were between 16 and 18 years old and because the nuns were responsible for them, they were not allowed to go out. And then we weren’t allowed to go out either.
Later came a good time. At the beginning I had time because we did 52 hours a week, but we did 5 hours and 4 hours and in between we had another 4 hours.
So I took the opportunity to study, I signed up for the CCC to do general culture, to do secretarial work, to do some decorating. I was very comfortable there. Then I got married and moved to another place, I went to work in a kind of readers’ circle where they made magazines and books to send to members.
And when I had my daughter, as they didn’t give me enough time to look after her, I changed jobs and took turns with my husband to look after my daughter. When he was older, I changed companies and had to take a bus for 5 minutes and then a train for 20 minutes.
I felt very comfortable because I had a job that didn’t depend on anyone, I depended on myself. Every day I was given a sheet of paper and I had to take it and fill it in and put what I did, check from time to time whether there were bacteria or not, so that they would go to the cleaning teams to clean. And it was very good. Then later, when my husband felt like it, he said we were coming to Spain and that was my undoing.
But I was lucky enough to land in one in a city because I said I wouldn’t go to a town. And for the first few years I was a bit tied down because I had cancer.
I was there for a while, but I will never get depressed and then in 2005, I started university as a senior. And it was the happiest time of my life, the happiest time because I was lucky enough to study with the older ones, but I also spent many years going to classes with the younger ones.

Case studies in Greece

Short bio of a facilitator (incl. experience in work with seniors and seniority as a facilitator):

Rena Dialektou have been a full-time nurse and trainer of the seniors for the last 10 years in Athens and Chios, Greece. Before that, she worked as a nurse in a clinic that catered mainly for the elderly.

Short bio of a senior:

Liana was an actress at the National Theatre of Greece, was an active scriptwriter and now writes in bits and pieces, while for many years she performed puppet shows for children. But she felt very well because she was in a residence where we were 122 girls, 110 Italian and 12 Spanish, and she integrated very well.
It was a residence for nuns. Although the Spanish women who went there were all adults, we didn’t have any free time. Because the Italian girls were between 16 and 18 years old and because the nuns were responsible for them, they were not allowed to go out. And then we weren’t allowed to go out either.
Later came a good time. At the beginning she had time because we did 52 hours a week, but we did 5 hours and 4 hours and in between we had another 4 hours.
So she took the opportunity to study, she signed up for the CCC to do general culture, to do secretarial work, to do some decorating. She was very comfortable there. Then she got married and moved to another place, she went to work in a kind of readers’ circle where they made magazines and books to send to members.
And when she had my daughter, as they didn’t give me enough time to look after her, she changed jobs and took turns with my husband to look after my daughter. When he was older, she changed companies and had to take a bus for 5 minutes and then a train for 20 minutes.
She felt very comfortable because she had a job that didn’t depend on anyone, she depended on myself. Every day she was given a sheet of paper and she had to take it and fill it in and put what she did, check from time to time whether there were bacteria or not, so that they would go to the cleaning teams to clean. And it was very good. Then later, when herhusband felt like it, he said we were coming to Spain and that was my undoing.
But she was lucky enough to land in one in a city because she said she wouldn’t go to a town. And for the first few years she was a bit tied down because I had cancer.
she was there for a while, but she will never get depressed and then in 2005, she started university as a senior. And it was the happiest time of my life, the happiest time because she was lucky enough to study with the older ones, but she also spent many years going to classes with the younger ones.

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