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Work Packages 2 - Booklet with intergenerational activities including best practices applied in partner countries

Intergenerational activities – scenarios

Intergenerational activities – scenarios of creative indoor/outdoor activities in a transgenerational context. Activities incorporate new technologies and include user-friendly digital tools that can be used during workshops with seniors and youth

Indoor Activities

Activity 1 - "Warm, warmer, hot"
Activity topic: Environment and Sustainable Environment
AbstractIntroduction to the issues related to climate change and global warming, explanation of basic concepts and processes.
Aims / ObjectivesThe main aim of this activity is to provide knowledge and skills connected with environment and sustainable environment, climate change and digital tools.
Topics / Skills coveredParticipants:
• understand the concepts of: atmosphere, climate, climate change, greenhouse effect, greenhouse gases, global warming
• know the relationship between climate and weather
• list greenhouse gases and their sources
• describe the phenomenon of the greenhouse effect in their own words
• explain why the climate is warming
• list situations and activities that adversely affect the climate
• recognize and understand the impact of human activity on the environment
• understand personal responsibility for climate change
• develop cause-and-effect thinking
Target groupYoung people (13-25) and seniors; group can be both small (6-8 people) or large (30 people)
Duration60 minutes
Venue
Classroom / Workshop room with tables
RequirementsLaptops, tablets or smartphones; projector
User friendly digital tools usedMentimeter (https://www.mentimeter.com)
More information about Mentimeter can be found in the User friendly digital tools section.
Suggested resourcesDirectorate-General for Climate Action, “Causes of climate change”: https://climate.ec.europa.eu/climate-change/causes-climate-change_en;
NASA Climate Kids,“What is the greenhouse effect?”:https://climatekids.nasa.gov/greenhouse-effect/;
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) , “Overview of Greenhouse Gases”: https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases

Handout 1Greenhouse gases
Description of each phase / part of the activityDurationThe role of the trainerThe role of the participantsRequirements
First, greet participants and ask them how they are feeling today. After listening to the answers, ask what makes them feel good. What makes people feel positive or negative when they wake up in the morning? Certainly one of the answers will be “the weather”. Ask what the weather is. Ask participants to think about what kind of weather conditions they like best, and therefore what is their favorite time of year. Talk about it for a moment. Then ask if they notice any changes in the course of the seasons. Ask seniors to evoke memories about how the seasons looked in the past and how they have changed. Does the image of the seasons that we have in our heads still match reality? It turns out that we cannot be sure whether we will make a snowman in the winter and rest in good weather in the summer. The weather has become much more unpredictable than it used to be. Ask why something strange is happening with the weather? Certainly one of the answers will be that it is the fault of climate change and global warming. Ask what climate is and how it differs from weather and explain that today you will talk about the causes of climate change.10 minutes
Moderates a discussion.Participate in a discussion.n/a
Ask participants if they know what the greenhouse effect is. Explain that the greenhouse effect is a natural phenomenon and is very important for the existence of life on Earth. If the greenhouse effect did not exist, the average temperature on earth would be around -18 degrees Celsius and life as we know it could not develop here. Explain that greenhouse gases are responsible for the greenhouse effect. Ask participants to name the greenhouse gases they know (carbon dioxide, methane, water vapor should appear). Then explain that the cause of climate change is the increase in the greenhouse effect. Ask why the greenhouse effect is increasing? Why is there so much greenhouse gas in the atmosphere? Participants should discuss climate warming stereotypes in their age groups, and then compare them with the whole group. Explain that climate scientists agree that humans are responsible for climate change.15 minutesExplains what the greenhouse effect is.


Moderates a discussion.
Name the greenhouse gases they know.

Discuss climate warming stereotypes in their age groups. Compare them with the whole group.
n/a
Offer participants a digital exercise. Using the Mentimeter tool, together create a Dynamic Word Cloud which will visualize the participant’s ideas and answers. Ask students to use their phones to list all known sources of greenhouse gases, both natural and man-made. Each participant should try to name as many sources of different gases as possible. See the “Handout 1. Greenhouse gases – examples” to see some example answers.10 minutes
Inspires, asks supporting questions, so that the answers are as diverse and comprehensive as possible.Write ideas on their smartphones using Mentimeter tool.
*If necessary, youth helps seniors to use the tool.
Laptops, tablets or smartphones; projector
When the image is ready, ask participants to think about which of the elements shown on the Word Cloud they have a personal influence on? How do they contribute to climate change? Moderate a discussion that aims to show that each of us is responsible for global warming. On the one hand, participants will realize that they are partly to blame for climate change, but on the other hand, this is very positive news, because it means that each of us, by changing small habits in our lives, has a chance and the ability to save the world from climate change.15 minutesAsks additional questions.
Leads a discussion.
Summarizes the answers.
Asks additional questions.
Leads a discussion.
Summarizes the answers.
Projector
At the end of the activity, participants evaluate the workshop, share feedback and comments.10 minutes
Summarizes the activity.Share feedback and comments.
Evaluate the activity.
n/a
1.CO2 from car exhaust
2.smoke from a forest fire
3.CO2 from a power plant that produces electricity for our TV set, lamps, washing machines
4.airplane exhaust
5.methane from cattle breeding
6.methane from decaying garbage
7.natural sources of greenhouse gases – volcanoes
8.natural sources of greenhouse gases – swamps
Activity 2 - “How can I limit my impact on climate change – criteria poker and campaign”
Activity topic: Environment and Sustainable Environment
AbstractThis exercise focuses on factors and behaviours that can limit people’s impact on climate change. During the dissuasions participants gain knowledge about factors and behaviours that are most important for sustainable environment. They also develop skills connected with digital tools and online campaigns.
Aims / ObjectivesThe main aim of this activity is to provide knowledge and skills connected with environment and sustainable environment, climate change and digital tools.
Topics / Skills coveredParticipants:
• understand the concept of climate change
• know what factors and behaviours can limit their impact on climate change
• describe the connection between activities and climate change in their own words
• list situations and activities that are the most important
• recognize and understand the impact of human activity on the environment
• understand personal responsibility for climate change
• develop cause-and-effect thinking
• use digital tools to spread the word
Target groupYoung people (16-25)and seniors; min. 6 participants
Duration90 minutes
Venue
Classroom / Workshop room with tables
RequirementsPrinted and cut cards from Handout 1 for each group; a board from Handout 2 for each group; laptops, tablets or smartphones; projector
User friendly digital tools usedCanva (www.canva.com)
More information about Canva can be found in the User friendly digital tools section.
Suggested resourcesUnited Nations,“Actions for a healthy planet”:https://www.un.org/en/actnow/ten-actions;
Natural Resources Defense Council,“How You Can Stop Global Warming”: https://www.nrdc.org/stories/how-you-can-stop-global-warming;
United Nations Environment Programme, “10 ways you can help fight the climate crisis”: https://www.unep.org/news-and-stories/story/10-ways-you-can-help-fight-climate-crisis;
WWF Armenia,“Green Living Tips”: https://wwf.panda.org/wwf_offices/armenia/help_us/eco_help_living/
Handout 1Criteria Poker Cards
Handout 2Poker board
Description of each phase / part of the activityDurationThe role of the trainerThe role of the participantsRequirements
Divide participants into groups of 3-5 people. Give each group a board and a set of 30 pre-cut criteria poker cards. Participants should shuffle the cards and distribute them to all members of the group. Ask everyone to read the sentences on their cards silently and decide which ones seem to be the most important and which are less important from the point of view of climate protection.

There are 24 squares on the poker board, numbered from 1 to 3. The squares marked with the number 1 will be the most important cards for students, the squares with 2 a little less important, and the squares with 3 the least important. 6 cards will not fit on the board.
10 minutes
Divides participants into groups.
Gives each group a board and a set of criteria poker cards.
Explains the activity.
Shuffle cards and distribute them among all members of the group.
Read sentences on their cards.
Decide which cards seem to be the most/least important from the climate protection point of view.
Printed and cut cards from Handout 1 for each group;
a board from Handout 2 for each group
In the first round, everyone places their most important card on the number 1 squares. They do it in turn, clockwise. If the group consists of five, someone will miss the square with number 1. If that person has a card that they think is more important than another card previously placed on 1, they can try to convince that person to move their card to a lower square. When the fields with 1 are already occupied and someone still has a card that they consider very important, they can convince the other members of the group to rearrange the cards on the board. Then participants place the cards one by one on the fields with number 2 and finally with number 3. Throughout the game, participants can discuss, convince each other to switch places. At the end of the game, the layout of the cards on the board should reflect the point of view of the whole group.20 minutesExplains the activity again if needed.
Helps participants.
Oversees the game.
Play criteria poker.
Discuss and exchange views.
Printed and cut cards from Handout 1 for each group;
a board from Handout 2 for each group
After the game, ask the representatives of the groups to read which cards they considered the most important (i.e. cards from the fields marked 1), check whether the choices of individual groups coincide.
Ask participants additional questions:
– Is the connection to climate change clear to them for each card?
– Do any of the actions listed on the cards seem completely unimportant to them and why?

This part of the exercise is a good starting point for further activity which is creating an information campaign on social media with leaflets, posters or videos on everybody’s impact on the climate.
15 minutesAsks additional questions.
Leads a discussion.
Summarizes this part of the activity.
Tell which cards they considered the most important.
Tell which cards seem completely unimportant.
n/a
Divide participants into pairs (seniors with youth). Based on the previous discussions and criteria poker, each pair will design short slogan and create simple leaflet, poster or video using Canva platform. The goal is to publish it on social media and spread the word among their friends and followers.35 minutesDivides participants into pairs.
Explains the task.
Helps participants to use Canva.
Design short slogan.
Create simple leaflet, poster or video.
Publish it.
*Youth should help seniors with digital tool.

Laptops, tablets or smartphones
At the end of the activity, each pair should show their published work to other participants and explain their slogan. Participants evaluate the workshops, share feedback and comments.10 minutes
Summarizes the second part of activity.Share feedback and comments.
Evaluate the activity.
Projector
Activity 3 - “The Art of Focus and Relaxation Breathing”
Activity topic: Hobbies, passions and interests
AbstractThe Art of Focus and Relaxation Breathing workshop is the best natural remedy for stress. This workshop offers presenters a time-efficient way to energise seniors/students and for them to acquire techniques to effectively manage stress. The workshop is an ideal form of student development and team building, the breathing workshop also teaches mindfulness, builds listener morale.
Aims / ObjectivesThe workshop is designed to help class leaders make effective use of relaxation and breathing techniques, giving them more energy and skills to combat fatigue, tiredness and stress. It will also give them tools they can implement in their classes to give their meetings with seniors and young people a slightly different perspective on their participation.
Topics / Skills coveredSeniors; School pupils; Students
Target groupSeniors; School pupils; Students
Duration90 minutes
Venue
Gymnasium, a large room preferably equipped with mattresses, blankets, yoga equipment, sound equipment, ladders and mirrors (optional)
RequirementsComfortable attire – leggings, tracksuit bottoms, casual clothing.
User friendly digital tools used1. Youtube App – to watch the tutorials and other useful materials
2. Music Apps such as Spotify – to play music needed for meditation

Description of each phase / part of the activityDurationThe role of the trainerThe role of the participantsRequirements
Energisingexercise 1:
● Place one hand on your chest, the other on your abdomen. Do a couple of similar breaths through the nose and then through the mouth and notice the difference (breathing through the nose is usually more diaphragmatic; through the mouth is most often associated with stress and exertion).
● Compared to breathing through the mouth, breathing through the nose puts about 50% more resistance on inhalation and exhalation, resulting in about 10-20% more oxygen uptake and greater lung flexibility.

There are 24 squares on the poker board, numbered from 1 to 3. The squares marked with the number 1 will be the most important cards for students, the squares with 2 a little less important, and the squares with 3 the least important. 6 cards will not fit on the board.
1-2 minutes
Instructions , supervision of correct execution of exercisesPerforming exercises according to the instructionsLoose-fitting clothing, calm environment , quiet, calm music
Energising Exercise 2:
Exercise to hold your breath and unblock your nose
● One normal inhale and then exhale through the nose, plug the nose with your fingers and march with the nose plugged until you feel the urge to inhale, then let it go and – still inhaling and exhaling through the nose – try to quickly bring yourself to a calm, deep breath. After a minuteortworepeat the wholecycle.
3 minutes in total
(1-2 minutes per cycle)
Instructions , supervision of correct execution of exercisesPerforming exercises according to the instructionsLoose-fitting clothing, calm environment, quiet, calm music
Energising Exercise 3:
Alternate breath (nadishodhanapranayama) – a breath known to every yoga practitioner.
● Inhale. Close the right nostril with the finger, calmly exhale with the left, then inhale with the left as well, release with the right nostril, exhale with the right and then calmly inhale with the right, and so on. Usually the right hand is used, with the index and middle finger touching the area between the eyebrows, and the thumb and other fingers are used to alternately plug the nasal cavity.
3 minutesInstructions , supervision of correct execution of exercisesPerforming exercises according to the instructionsLoose-fitting clothing, calm environment, quiet, calm music
Exercise 1: ‘Normal’ breathing.
● Breathe through the nose. Close your eyes and try to breathe diaphragmatically, concentrating on the Dantian area, on the movements of the diaphragm. On the inhalation, relax and push out the perineal area (Huiyin point area) slightly, on the exhalation we lift (“close”) the Huiyin slightly. Compare your own sensations when the inhalation is shorter than the exhalation and vice versa. Also, when you keep the Huiyin raised at all times (on inhalation and exhalation), also pay attention to the lumbar part of the torso, which also contracts and expands with the rhythm of the breath.
3 minutesInstructions , supervision of correct execution of exercisesPerforming exercises according to the instructionsLoose-fitting clothing, calm environment , quiet, calm music
Exercise 2: “Embryonic” breathing.
● Analogous to exercise No. 1 except that you breathe in reverse, i.e. you contract the muscles around the Dantian (diaphragm, abdomen, loins, Huiyin) on inhalation and relax them on exhalation.
3 minutesInstructions , supervision of correct execution of exercisesPerforming exercises according to the instructionsLoose-fitting clothing, calm environment, quiet, calm music
Exercise 3: “Spinalbreathing”.
● Breathe through the nose, five breaths per minute. Then close your eyes. On the inhalation, total concentration on the top of the head (Baihui point), imagining that the inhalation goes there; on the exhalation, the same, except that the concentration is on the bottom of the spine, in the perineum area
3 minutesInstructions , supervision of correct execution of exercisesPerforming exercises according to the instructionsLoose-fitting clothing, calm environment, quiet, calm music
Exercise 4: “Breathing with the hands”.
● Breathe embryonically (inversely). On the inhalation, concentrate on the Dantian, on the exhalation on the Laogong points in the centre of the palms. This breathing has a beneficial effect especially on the Heart and Lungs.
4 minutesInstructions , supervision of correct execution of exercisesPerforming exercises according to the instructionsLoose-fitting clothing, calm environment, quiet, calm music
Exercise 5: “Breathing with the whole body / whole skin”.
● There are many ways of breathing under this name, mostly very advanced ones. Nevertheless, it is worth trying one of the simpler versions, which consists of relaxing in any position and breathing by imagining that our entire skin surface is involved in the process of inhaling and exhaling.
● Mouth closed, body relaxed, rapid breathing through the nose, the Energising Breath stimulates the body, but it should be remembered that – contrary to popular belief – deeper and faster breaths do not significantly increase the oxygenation of the arterial blood, which is already saturated with 99-99% oxygen in normal breathing
3 cycles per minute – 15-20 second each.Instructions , supervision of correct execution of exercisesPerforming exercises according to the instructionsLoose-fitting clothing, calm environment, quiet, calm music
Exercise 6: Normaldiaphragmaticbreathing
● Breathing 4-4-4
● Each phase: full inhale, hold, full exhale, hold: count to four (4)
5 minutesInstructions , supervision of correct execution of exercisesPerforming exercises according to the instructionsLoose-fitting clothing, calm environment, quiet, calm music
Exercise 7: Relaxationbreath
● Breathing 4-7-9
● Find comfortable position, tip of tongue remains on the hard palate behind the teeth, inhale through the nose, exhale with a sound, as if blowing out a candle, through a slightly open mouth. The wholecycle:
● Exhalethrough the mouth
● Close the mouth, inhale silently through the nose counting to four (4)
● hold your breath while counting to seven (7)
● Exhale through the mouth with a sound count of eight (8)
● Repeat no more than 4 cycles at first, at least twice a day, after a month – 8 cycles.
● It is not important how long the cycle is, what is important is the ratio between inhalation, breath holding and exhalation.
5 minutesInstructions , supervision of correct execution of exercisesPerforming exercises according to the instructionsLoose-fitting clothing, calm environment, quiet, calm music
Exercise 8: Breathing with resistance
If you want to be as relaxed as a cat 🙂 – cats purr to deepen their state of nervous system relaxation
● By holding the tongue behind the upper teeth, we create a certain resistance to the flow of air when exhaling, either by mouth or nose, with an associated sound.
● When exhaling with the mouth rounded, there can be, for example, a sound like the blowing out of a candle, a “huuuu” or a soundless “haaaaa”.
● When exhaling with the nose, we emit a “white noise”, like the sound of the ocean (this is called Ocean Breath).
4-5 minutes total, 5 breaths per minuteInstructions , supervision of correct execution of exercisesPerforming exercises according to the instructionsLoose-fitting clothing, calm environment, quiet, calm music
Exercise 9: Stretching
● Sit on the mat in a cross-legged position . Arms relaxed, breathing calmly. Lift your right arm sideways over your head, leaning to the left.
● Lean to the left.
● Take a deep breath in through the nose directing the air to the ribs, feel the right side stretch.
● Exhale with the mouth lowering the arm to the starting position.
● Switch sides
5 minutes in total.
6-8 repetitions for each side
Instructions , supervision of correct execution of exercisesPerforming exercises according to the instructionsLoose-fitting clothing, calm environment, quiet, calm music
Exercise 10: Stretching the trunk muscles
● Sit comfortably on the mat. Interlace your hands in front of you, palms facing forward.
● Inhale, raise the interlaced hands above your head and stretch upwards.
● With an exhalation, lean forward with your palms facing each other, tucking your head between your shoulders and taking all the air out of your abdomen.
6 minutes in total, 10 repetitionsInstructions , supervision of correct execution of exercisesPerforming exercises according to the instructionsLoose-fitting clothing, calm environment, quiet, calm music
Exercise 11: Body scanning
It is one meditation technique that focuses on shifting attention from one part of the body to another.
● Lie comfortably on your back, cross your legs, relax your shoulders and close your eyes. Then breathe calmly and deeply for about two minutes. Allow your abdomen to rise on the inhale and fall on the exhale.
● Breathe in this way until you feel your body relax and unwind. Then start concentrating on specific parts of your body – feet, legs, abdomen, spine… Focus especially on areas where you feel tension or pain.
2 minutes+ 10 minutesInstructions , supervision of correct execution of exercisesPerforming exercises according to the instructionsLoose-fitting clothing, calm environment, quiet, calm music
The Lastphase
● Close your eyes, focus on the music and think of something pleasant.
● Inhale and exhale, while saying quietly “OMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM” until the air runs out. Repeat 3-6 times.
6 minutesInstructions , supervision of correct execution of exercisesPerforming exercises according to the instructionsLoose-fitting clothing, calm environment, quiet, calm music
Slowly open your eyes, turn on your side and, supporting yourself with your hand, get down on your knees and slowly stand up. Stand up straight and, inhaling, lift your arms up, then while exhaling, lower them 3 times.
Important!
Dizziness during exercise can be caused by dehydration, but also by improper breathing. They are often the result of too low sugar levels, and in most cases they can be avoided by following a few rules.

First of all, you should make sure that the intensity of training is always adapted to your capabilities. During training, you need to ensure proper hydration of your body, and eat an appropriate snack before and after training. If we feel bad while exercising, we should stop immediately. Otherwise, it may lead to fainting or loss of consciousness, so dizziness and rapid heartbeat should never be underestimated.
2 minutesInstructions , supervision of correct execution of exercisesPerforming exercises according to the instructionsLoose-fitting clothing, calm environment, quiet, calm music
Activity 4 - "Exploring Cultural Artifacts"
Activity topic: Cultural routes for dialogue between generations
AbstractThis activity aims to foster intergenerational dialogue by exploring cultural artifacts from different time periods and regions. Participants will have the opportunity to share their knowledge, experiences, and perspectives on various cultural objects. The activity encourages mutual learning and understanding between seniors and young people while promoting cultural appreciation.
Aims / Objectives– Foster intergenerational dialogue and exchange of knowledge.
– Enhance cultural awareness and appreciation.
– Develop communication and listening skills.
– Promote respect and understanding between different generations.
Topics / Skills covered– Cultural heritage and diversity.
– Improvement of intergenerational communication and active listening.
– Critical thinking and analysis.
– Collaboration and teamwork.
Target groupMinimum: 10 participants (5 seniors and 5 young people)
Maximum: 20 participants (10 seniors and 10 young people)
DurationApproximately 110 minutes
Venue
A spacious room with tables and chairs, where participants can comfortably gather in small groups.
Requirements1. Cultural artifacts (e.g., paintings, sculptures, photographs, traditional clothing) from different cultures and time periods.

Here are some examples of cultural artifacts from different cultures and time periods along with corresponding links to images or descriptions that can provide a vivid understanding:
-The Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci:
-Link: Mona Lisa Image
-The Great Wall of China:
-Link: Great Wall of China Image
-The Rosetta Stone:
-Link: Rosetta Stone Image and Description
-The Venus de Milo:
-Link: Venus de Milo Image and Description
-TraditionalJapanese Kimono:
-Link: TraditionalJapanese Kimono Image
-Mayan Stone Carvings:
-Link: Mayan Stone Carvings Image
-EgyptianPyramids:
-Link: EgyptianPyramids Image
– These links provide images or descriptions of the cultural artifacts mentioned, allowing viewers to gain a vivid understanding of their appearance and significance.
2. Descriptions or information sheets about each artifact.
3. Flip charts or whiteboards with markers.
4. Paper and pens for participants to take notes.
User friendly digital tools used– Digital projector or large screen to display images of cultural artifacts.
Google Arts & Culture: A digital platform that provides access to high-resolution images of artworks from partner museums and offers virtual tours. Link to Google Arts & Culture
– Online platforms or websites showcasing virtual museum collections for additional artifacts and resources. Concrete resources, like Google Arts & Culture, serve as valuable tools for both educators and enthusiasts to explore and learn about cultural heritage.

Suggested resources– Online museum collections, such as the Google Arts.
– Cultural books or magazines showcasing diverse cultural artifacts.
– Articles or videos on cultural heritage and its importance in fostering intergenerational dialogue.
Handout 1
Cultural Artifacts Worksheet
Description of each phase / part of the activityDurationThe role of the trainerThe role of the participantsRequirements
Introduction to the activity5 minutes
The trainer introduces the activity, “Cultural Exchange through Storytelling,” to the participants, highlighting the importance of intergenerational dialogue, cultural understanding, and empathy. The trainer encourages active participation, open-mindedness, and respect for diverse perspectives throughout the activity.– Listen attentively to the trainer’s introduction.
– Ask questions if any clarification is needed.
n/a
Icebreaker Activity: “Cultural Trivia” 10 minutes
Participants form small teams of mixed generations and engage in a friendly competition to answer cultural trivia questions. The trainer provides a set of questions related to various cultures and traditions. Participants collaborate within their teams, discussing their cultural knowledge and sharing insights. The trainer facilitates the activity, keeping track of the teams’ progress and providing hints if needed.
Indicative questions:
– In which country is the Taj Mahal located?
– What is the traditional dance of Ireland called?
– What is the national flower of Japan?
– Who painted the Mona Lisa?
– Which city is known as the fashion capital of the world?
– Active Participation: Participants actively engage in the activity by forming teams and collaborating within their teams to answer the cultural trivia questions.
– Knowledge Sharing: Participants contribute their cultural knowledge and insights during team discussions, sharing information about various cultures and traditions.
– Collaboration: Participants work together within their teams to find the answers and collectively decide on the best response for each question.
– Respectful Competition: Participants participate in a friendly competition, demonstrating good sportsmanship and respect for other teams’ efforts.
Participants form small teams with a diverse mix of seniors and young people. The trainer provides culturally diverse trivia questions related to various cultures and traditions. Participants collaborate within their teams, using paper and pens to discuss and jot down their answers. The activity takes place in a suitable indoor space, such as a meeting room or community center. The trainer facilitates the activity, explaining the rules, tracking teams’ progress, and offering hints if necessary, ensuring an engaging and respectful competition.
Teambuilding Activity: “Cultural Jigsaw Puzzle” 15 minutesThe role of the trainer in the “Cultural Jigsaw Puzzle” teambuilding activity is to facilitate and guide the participants throughout the process. The trainer introduces the activity, explains the rules, and provides each group with a jigsaw puzzle representing a specific culture. They ensure that participants understand the objective of the activity and encourage collaboration, teamwork, and communication within the groups. The trainer offers support and guidance when needed, fostering a positive and inclusive environment where participants can appreciate and learn about different cultures through the jigsaw puzzle activity.

Here are the rules to be explained by the trainer:
1. Introduction:
– Trainer explains the importance of teamwork and cultural appreciation.
– Each group receives a jigsaw puzzle representing a specific culture.
2. Puzzle Assembly:
– Groups work together to assemble their puzzle within a given time frame.
– Effective communication and collaboration are encouraged.
3. Discussion:
– Groups engage in discussions about the cultural significance of the puzzle’s image.
– Participants share their knowledge and experiences related to the culture.
4. Teamwork and Collaboration:
– All group members actively contribute to the puzzle assembly and discussions.
– Effective communication, active listening, and respect for different viewpoints are important.
5. Time Limit and Completion:
– Trainer sets a time limit and announces when time is about to expire.
– Recognition or rewards can be given to groups that complete the puzzle within the time limit.
6. Reflection and Debrief:
– Participants reflect on their experience and share what they learned about the culture.
– Group discussion focuses on teamwork and cultural appreciation.

Note: Adapt the rules as needed based on puzzle complexity, group size, and trainer preferences.
Participants form small groups with a mix of seniors and young people, actively engaging in the teambuilding activity. They collaborate and communicate within their groups to assemble the cultural jigsaw puzzle. Participants contribute their perspectives and knowledge, discussing the cultural significance of the image or artwork as they work together. They demonstrate teamwork, creativity, and open-mindedness throughout the activity, fostering a sense of appreciation for diverse cultures.The activity requires a suitable space for participants to gather in small groups, ensuring enough room for the jigsaw puzzles and group discussions. The trainer provides each group with a jigsaw puzzle featuring an image or artwork representing a specific culture. The puzzles should be age-appropriate and challenging enough to encourage collaboration. Additionally, the trainer may supply any necessary materials, such as tables, chairs, and adequate lighting, to create a conducive environment for the activity.
Cultural Exchange through Storytelling25 minutes is the optimal time for the number of 10 Participants. (time can be adjusted depending of the number of the participants)The trainer takes on the role of a facilitator during the main activity of “Cultural Exchange through Storytelling.” They begin by introducing and explaining the activity, emphasizing the significance of active participation, open-mindedness, and respect for diverse perspectives. The trainer may provide storytelling prompts or questionnaires that are specifically designed to guide the participants and ignite their storytelling ideas. They facilitate discussions by creating a safe and inclusive environment where participants feel comfortable sharing their stories. The trainer actively encourages active listening among the participants, ensuring that everyone’s voice is heard and valued. They also play a crucial role in guiding the participants to ask thoughtful questions that promote deeper understanding and engagement with the shared stories. Through their facilitation skills, the trainer fosters an atmosphere of empathy, respect, and cultural appreciation.Participants actively engage in the main activity by sharing stories from their cultural backgrounds, such as personal stories, folktales, or anecdotes. They listen attentively to each other’s stories, demonstrating respect and empathy for diverse perspectives. Participants actively participate in discussions, ask questions to deepen their understanding, and contribute to a meaningful dialogue. They embrace the opportunity to learn from each other’s experiences and gain a broader cultural understanding.

The main activity of “Cultural Exchange through Storytelling” requires a suitable space for participants to gather and engage in discussions. This can be a comfortable and quiet room that allows for group interactions. Additionally, the trainer may provide storytelling prompts or questionnaires as resources to facilitate discussions and spark storytelling ideas. Participants may also benefit from having paper and pens to jot down notes if desired, allowing them to reflect on the stories shared and contribute actively to the dialogue.
Reflection Time5 minutesThe trainer facilitates a brief reflection session where participants have the opportunity to share their key learnings, observations, and interesting insights gained from the activity. The trainer encourages participants to discuss the impact of the activity on their perceptions, appreciation for diversity, and connections with others.Participants reflect on the importance of intergenerational dialogue and cultural understanding based on their storytelling experiencesn/a
Activity 5 - "Cultural Exchange through Storytelling"
Activity topic: Cultural routes for dialogue between generations
AbstractThe “Cultural Exchange through Storytelling” activity provides an opportunity for participants to engage in intergenerational dialogue and cultural exchange through storytelling. Participants will share stories from their own cultural backgrounds, fostering understanding, empathy, and appreciation for diverse perspectives. This activity aims to bridge and understand generational differences, promote cultural awareness, and strengthen intergenerational connections.
Aims / Objectives-Foster intergenerational dialogue and connection.
-Promote cultural awareness and appreciation.
-Enhance communication and listening skills.
-Encourage empathy and understanding of diverse perspectives.
-Create a sense of community through shared storytelling experiences.
Topics / Skills covered-Intergenerational communication and connection.
-Cultural diversity and appreciation.
– Storytelling and listening skills.
– Empathy and understanding.
Target groupThis activity is designed for a group of 10 to 20 participants, including seniors and young people aged from 18 to 28. The minimum requirement is at least 5 seniors and 5 young people to ensure a meaningful intergenerational exchange.
DurationApproximately 60 minutes
Venue
A comfortable and quiet space that allows for group discussions and storytelling. It can be conducted in a community center, library, or any suitable indoor location.
Requirements-Seating arrangements to facilitate group discussions.
-Flip charts or whiteboards with markers.
-Paper and pens for participants to jot down notes if desired.
-A projector or screen (optional) to display images or videos related to storytelling.
User friendly digital tools used-Zoom: Zoom is a versatile video conferencing platform that facilitates virtual meetings, webinars, and intergenerational interactions for remote or hybrid settings. It offers features such as screen sharing, chat, and breakout rooms, making it a popular choice for both professional and personal communication. Zoom’s user-friendly interface and accessibility options make it suitable for people of all ages and backgrounds, allowing seamless participation and connection across generations https://zoom.us/.

-Padlet: Padlet is an online collaborative platform that enables participants to share and showcase stories, images, videos, and other multimedia content related to their cultural backgrounds. It provides a digital canvas where users can collaboratively contribute and curate content, fostering a sense of community and cultural exchange. Padlet’s ease of use and customization options make it a valuable tool for preserving and celebrating cultural diversity through engaging visual presentations https://it.padlet.com.

-Storybird: Storybird is a digital storytelling tool that empowers participants to create and share their own narratives using a variety of templates and multimedia elements. Users can easily combine text, illustrations, and images to craft visually appealing and engaging stories. Storybird encourages creativity and storytelling across generations, offering a platform for individuals of different ages to express themselves and share their unique perspectives through storytelling https://storybird.com.
Suggested resources• Books, articles, or websites on cultural storytelling and intergenerational communication.
• Storytelling prompts or questionnaires to facilitate discussions and spark storytelling ideas.
• Example: Europeana: Share Your Story: Link: https://www.europeana.eu/en/blog/share-your-story
• Description: Europeana is a digital platform that provides access to Europe’s cultural heritage. Their “Share Your Story” initiative encourages individuals to share personal stories related to European culture, history, and traditions. Participants can explore the website for inspiration and contribute their own stories.
Handout 1
Storytelling Prompt
Description of each phase / part of the activityDurationThe role of the trainerThe role of the participantsRequirements
Introduction to the activity5 minutes
The trainer introduces the activity, “Cultural Exchange through Storytelling,” to the participants, highlighting the importance of intergenerational dialogue, cultural understanding, and empathy. The trainer encourages active participation, open-mindedness, and respect for diverse perspectives throughout the activity.– Listen attentively to the trainer’s introduction.
– Ask questions if any clarification is needed.
n/a
Icebreaker Activity: “Cultural Trivia” 10 minutes
Participants form small teams of mixed generations and engage in a friendly competition to answer cultural trivia questions. The trainer provides a set of questions related to various cultures and traditions. Participants collaborate within their teams, discussing their cultural knowledge and sharing insights. The trainer facilitates the activity, keeping track of the teams’ progress and providing hints if needed.
Indicative questions:
– In which country is the Taj Mahal located?
– What is the traditional dance of Ireland called?
– What is the national flower of Japan?
– Who painted the Mona Lisa?
– Which city is known as the fashion capital of the world?
– Active Participation: Participants actively engage in the activity by forming teams and collaborating within their teams to answer the cultural trivia questions.
– Knowledge Sharing: Participants contribute their cultural knowledge and insights during team discussions, sharing information about various cultures and traditions.
– Collaboration: Participants work together within their teams to find the answers and collectively decide on the best response for each question.
– Respectful Competition: Participants participate in a friendly competition, demonstrating good sportsmanship and respect for other teams’ efforts.
Participants form small teams with a diverse mix of seniors and young people. The trainer provides culturally diverse trivia questions related to various cultures and traditions. Participants collaborate within their teams, using paper and pens to discuss and jot down their answers. The activity takes place in a suitable indoor space, such as a meeting room or community center. The trainer facilitates the activity, explaining the rules, tracking teams’ progress, and offering hints if necessary, ensuring an engaging and respectful competition.
Teambuilding Activity: “Cultural Jigsaw Puzzle” 15 minutesThe role of the trainer in the “Cultural Jigsaw Puzzle” teambuilding activity is to facilitate and guide the participants throughout the process. The trainer introduces the activity, explains the rules, and provides each group with a jigsaw puzzle representing a specific culture. They ensure that participants understand the objective of the activity and encourage collaboration, teamwork, and communication within the groups. The trainer offers support and guidance when needed, fostering a positive and inclusive environment where participants can appreciate and learn about different cultures through the jigsaw puzzle activity.

Here are the rules to be explained by the trainer:
1. Introduction:
– Trainer explains the importance of teamwork and cultural appreciation.
– Each group receives a jigsaw puzzle representing a specific culture.
2. Puzzle Assembly:
– Groups work together to assemble their puzzle within a given time frame.
– Effective communication and collaboration are encouraged.
3. Discussion:
– Groups engage in discussions about the cultural significance of the puzzle’s image.
– Participants share their knowledge and experiences related to the culture.
4. Teamwork and Collaboration:
– All group members actively contribute to the puzzle assembly and discussions.
– Effective communication, active listening, and respect for different viewpoints are important.
5. Time Limit and Completion:
– Trainer sets a time limit and announces when time is about to expire.
– Recognition or rewards can be given to groups that complete the puzzle within the time limit.
6. Reflection and Debrief:
– Participants reflect on their experience and share what they learned about the culture.
– Group discussion focuses on teamwork and cultural appreciation.

Note: Adapt the rules as needed based on puzzle complexity, group size, and trainer preferences.
Participants form small groups with a mix of seniors and young people, actively engaging in the teambuilding activity. They collaborate and communicate within their groups to assemble the cultural jigsaw puzzle. Participants contribute their perspectives and knowledge, discussing the cultural significance of the image or artwork as they work together. They demonstrate teamwork, creativity, and open-mindedness throughout the activity, fostering a sense of appreciation for diverse cultures.The activity requires a suitable space for participants to gather in small groups, ensuring enough room for the jigsaw puzzles and group discussions. The trainer provides each group with a jigsaw puzzle featuring an image or artwork representing a specific culture. The puzzles should be age-appropriate and challenging enough to encourage collaboration. Additionally, the trainer may supply any necessary materials, such as tables, chairs, and adequate lighting, to create a conducive environment for the activity.
Cultural Exchange through Storytelling25 minutes is the optimal time for the number of 10 Participants. (time can be adjusted depending of the number of the participants)The trainer takes on the role of a facilitator during the main activity of “Cultural Exchange through Storytelling.” They begin by introducing and explaining the activity, emphasizing the significance of active participation, open-mindedness, and respect for diverse perspectives. The trainer may provide storytelling prompts or questionnaires that are specifically designed to guide the participants and ignite their storytelling ideas. They facilitate discussions by creating a safe and inclusive environment where participants feel comfortable sharing their stories. The trainer actively encourages active listening among the participants, ensuring that everyone’s voice is heard and valued. They also play a crucial role in guiding the participants to ask thoughtful questions that promote deeper understanding and engagement with the shared stories. Through their facilitation skills, the trainer fosters an atmosphere of empathy, respect, and cultural appreciation.Participants actively engage in the main activity by sharing stories from their cultural backgrounds, such as personal stories, folktales, or anecdotes. They listen attentively to each other’s stories, demonstrating respect and empathy for diverse perspectives. Participants actively participate in discussions, ask questions to deepen their understanding, and contribute to a meaningful dialogue. They embrace the opportunity to learn from each other’s experiences and gain a broader cultural understanding.

The main activity of “Cultural Exchange through Storytelling” requires a suitable space for participants to gather and engage in discussions. This can be a comfortable and quiet room that allows for group interactions. Additionally, the trainer may provide storytelling prompts or questionnaires as resources to facilitate discussions and spark storytelling ideas. Participants may also benefit from having paper and pens to jot down notes if desired, allowing them to reflect on the stories shared and contribute actively to the dialogue.
Reflection Time5 minutesThe trainer facilitates a brief reflection session where participants have the opportunity to share their key learnings, observations, and interesting insights gained from the activity. The trainer encourages participants to discuss the impact of the activity on their perceptions, appreciation for diversity, and connections with others.Participants reflect on the importance of intergenerational dialogue and cultural understanding based on their storytelling experiencesn/a
Activity 6 - “Virtual Museums”
Activity topic: Intergenerational art and craft ideas
Abstract360-degree museum tour is a fun way for art lovers to travel the world virtually. Many of the most spectacular museums around the world, from the Metropolitan to the Louvre to the Vatican, now offer guided virtual tours on their website. Tours typically let viewers click around on different pieces to learn more about their history. Let’s organize a guided museum tour for elderly people and younger generations.
Aims / ObjectivesOverall, this activity can promote well-being, learning, and personal growth for elderly individuals while fostering meaningful connections with the younger generation.
Topics / Skills covered– Digital literacy: With the guidance of younger individuals, elderly participants can become more familiar and comfortable with technology, improving their digital literacy skills. On the other hand, older people can draw the attention of young people by checking everything several times, from several sources in the virtual space, because not all information/ news is reliable.
– Intergenerational learning: Both elderly and younger participants can learn from each other’s perspectives, fostering mutual understanding and respect.
– Accessibility: Virtual museum tours provide an accessible way for elderly individuals with limited mobility or health concerns to engage with cultural experiences they may not otherwise be able to enjoy.
– Social interaction: The activity encourages social interaction and bonding between generations, helping to combat loneliness and isolation often experienced by elderly individuals.
Target groupApproximately around 3-4 hours
DurationAn ordinary room with chairs and tables
Venue
An ordinary room with chairs and tables
Requirements– Laptops or PC-s. If it is possible a projector for enjoying a common tour.
User friendly digital tools used– Google Arts & Culture: https://artsandculture.google.com (accessed: 2023.09.17)
– Zoom: https://zoom.us (accessed: 2023.09.17)
Suggested resourceshttps://upgradedpoints.com/travel/best-virtual-museum-tours/ (accessed: 2023.09.17)
Handout 1
Cultural Artifacts Worksheet
Description of each phase / part of the activityDurationThe role of the trainerThe role of the participantsRequirements
Icebreaker Activity

A good icebreaker activity before the virtual museum tour can help participants get to know each other, create a relaxed atmosphere, and foster a sense of community. Here are a few icebreaker ideas suitable for a virtual setting:

I. Quick personal introduction with a creative twist: Ask each participant to introduce themselves and share a fun or creative fact about themselves, such as their favorite artistic medium, a unique hobby, or a memorable cultural experience. This activity helps the group learn more about each other while keeping the focus on art and culture.

II. Favorite Artwork Discussion (FAD): Have each participant share an image of their favorite artwork or artist and briefly explain why they admire the piece or artist. This activity helps participants learn about each other’s artistic preferences and can spark engaging conversations about art.
around 20 minutesRemember to keep the icebreaker activity light and engaging, and encourage participants to actively contribute to the discussion. This will help create a friendly atmosphere and build a sense of community before embarking on the virtual museum tour.Participants actively engage by introducing themselves and sharing personal information related to art or culture, such as their favourite artistic medium, unique hobby, or memorable cultural experience. They also listen to other participants, ask questions, and contribute to the discussion, fostering a sense of community and mutual understanding. By participating in the icebreaker, attendees get to know each other better, creating a relaxed and inclusive atmosphere for the upcoming virtual museum tour.

in case of FAD (Favorite Artwork Discussion) every participant should bring a picture (a printed copy) of his/her favourite artwork.
Team building
A team-building activity before the virtual museum tour can help participants connect, build rapport, and work together effectively. Here are a few team-building ideas suitable for a virtual setting that can be adapted to the context of a museum tour:

I. Collaborative Art Piece (CAP): Assign each participant a portion of a famous painting or artwork. For example, if there are six groups, divide the chosen painting into six different pieces. Each group should recreate their assigned portion using any medium they prefer (drawing, painting, digital art, etc.). Once everyone has completed their section, compile the pieces into a single, cohesive image, and compare it with the original artwork. This activity promotes teamwork, creativity, and appreciation for art. Intergenerational dimension of the activity lies in tight collaboration of seniors and young people.

II. Museum Scavenger Hunt: Before the virtual museum tour, provide participants with a list of specific artworks or exhibit features to find during the tour. Divide participants into teams and have them work together to locate the items on the list. The first team to find all the items wins. This activity promotes teamwork, communication, and engagement with the museum content.
Around 30-40 minutesChoose a team-building activity that aligns with the interests and preferences of the participants, and consider the time constraints and technical requirements of the virtual setting. By engaging in a team-building activity before the virtual museum tour, participants can establish a sense of camaraderie and cooperation that will enhance their overall experience.

Participants actively engage in collaborative tasks, such as creating a collaborative art piece or working together to complete a scavenger hunt. They communicate, share ideas, and work together to achieve a common goal, fostering a sense of teamwork and collaboration. By participating in the team-building activity, attendees connect with each other, build rapport, and prepare for an engaging and enjoyable virtual museum tour.

in case of CAP (Collaborative Art Piece) you need a picture of the selected painting, which can be divided into parts according to the number of groups,
drawing or painting materials (coloured and graphite pencils, paint, brush etc.) or a digital tool for drawing on pc/laptop (Corel Painter, Rebelle 6, Procreate, Clip Studio Paint Pro etc, or digital drawing board)
Main activity, the Virtual Museum Tour

Virtual museums foster an enlightening learning environment for any age group. A museum can be an augmented model that simulates the experience of going through the exhibits, reading about each piece and exploring. They can simply be photos, videos and samples that provide information about the contents of the museum.

Both age groups elderly people and youngsters can discover new things about art, history, nature, science, technology, literature, or any form of culture.

Virtual environments offer an enjoyable learning experience serving as a tool for learning through entertainment.

A virtual museum tour for an intergenerational group should consider accessibility, ease of use, and engagement of the group.

Here are the stages of a well-organised virtual museum tour for elderly and young people:

1. Preparation: Choose a virtual museum tour that offers user-friendly navigation and high-quality visuals. Ensure that the tour is compatible with the devices and internet connections of the participants. Provide clear instructions on how to access the tour and any necessary software or tools beforehand. If you feel it makes the explanation easier, make infographics that make it easier to understand and align theory with practice.

2. Accessibility: If needed, adjust font sizes, screen contrasts, and audio levels to accommodate the varying needs of elderly participants. Make sure to provide closed captioning or transcripts for any audio or video content.

3. Guided tour: Navigate through the virtual museum tour at a comfortable pace, allowing time for participants to absorb the content and ask questions. Encourage discussion and interaction between participants, as well as with the tour guide if one is present.

4. Collaboration: If elderly participants are paired with younger individuals, encourage them to work together to explore the exhibits, share insights, and learn from each other’s perspectives. This fosters intergenerational connections and enriches the experience for everyone involved.

5. Breaks: Schedule short breaks to help participants maintain focus and avoid screen fatigue. Encourage participants to stand up, stretch, or move around during breaks to stay comfortable and engaged.
Virtual museums allow users to visit and explore at their own pace and research additional information as needed without time constraints, which is different from a trip where there is a program and schedule. This is an important advantage for young people with special learning difficulties who often need more time than their peers during any learning activities.

6. Reflection and discussion: After the tour, provide an opportunity for participants to share their thoughts, insights, and favourite aspects of the museum experience. This can help reinforce learning and create a sense of community among the group.
About 2 hours (but it depends on the group too)By considering the unique needs and preferences of elderly participants, you can create a virtual museum tour experience that is engaging, accessible, and enjoyable for everyone involved. The trainer’s main role is to guide participants through the exhibits, encourage discussion and interaction, and ensure that the tour is accessible and engaging for all attendees.



Participants actively engage in the exploration of the exhibits, absorbing the content, and asking questions. They also share their insights, perspectives, and reflections on the artwork, promoting a sense of community and mutual learning. By participating in the tour, attendees gain knowledge and appreciation for art and culture while fostering intergenerational connections with their peers.


A room with pc-s/lap tops with internet accessibility
Activity 7 - “Nature Collages”
Activity topic: Intergenerational art and craft ideas
AbstractNature Collages: Collect natural materials such as leaves, flowers, and twigs during a walk or hike. Use a scanning app on a smartphone or tablet to create digital collages of the collected items.If older people require it, younger participants can help elderly individuals learn how to use the scanning app and arrange the digital collages and the Elders can teach the youth the names of the plants.
Aims / ObjectivesOverall, the nature collage activity is a versatile and engaging experience that can promote intergenerational connections, creativity, digital skills development, and environmental awareness, providing benefits for participants of all ages.
Topics / Skills coveredWith the nature collage activity several positive outcomes for both elderly and younger participants can be achieved:
– Digital skills development: By incorporating digital tools like scanning apps or photo editing apps, participants can learn new digital skills and become more comfortable using technology, especially for elderly individuals who may be less familiar with modern devices and applications.
– Intergenerational bonding: By pairing elderly individuals with younger ones, you create opportunities for them to connect, share experiences, and learn from each other. These fosters understanding and appreciation between different age groups.
– Artistic expression: Creating nature collages promotes creativity and self-expression, allowing participants to explore their artistic side and create unique, personal artworks using natural materials.
– Social interaction: Sharing and discussing the collages with the group provides an opportunity for social interaction, which can be particularly beneficial for elderly individuals who may experience isolation or loneliness.
Target groupElderly and young people (15-20 persons, young people between the aged 16-25)
Duration1 day
Venue
Suitable outdoor location forest or park/ indoor location to work with the collected materials
RequirementsCollection of eco-friendly bags or containers, smart phones or tablets, scanning app (Adobe Scan, Microsoft Office Lens etc.), photo editing or collage app (Canva, Adobe Photoshop Express)
User friendly digital tools usedPlantNet (app on Google Play): PlantNet is a popular mobile application that serves as a plant identification tool. Users can simply take a photo of a plant’s leaves, flowers, or other parts, and the app uses image recognition technology to identify the plant’s species. Additionally, PlantNet allows users to explore an extensive database of plant information, contribute to a collaborative plant identification project, and learn more about the flora around them, making it a valuable resource for nature enthusiasts and botany enthusiasts.

Adobe Scan is a mobile scanning application that allows users to capture and digitize physical documents and images using their smartphone or tablet’s camera. It offers features such as document cropping, image enhancement, and OCR (Optical Character Recognition) for text extraction. The app is designed for creating high-quality digital scans for various purposes, from archiving documents to creating digital copies of photos.

Canva is a versatile graphic design platform that enables users to create collages and edit pictures with ease. It offers a wide selection of templates, tools, and features for arranging images, adding text, and enhancing photos. Canva simplifies collage creation and image editing, making it accessible to users of various design skill levels.
Suggested resourceshttps://plantnet.org/en/ (accessed: 2023.09.17)
https://www.adobe.com/acrobat/mobile/scanner-app.html (accessed: 2023.11.02.)
https://www.canva.com/en/ (accessed: 2023.11.02.)
Handout 1
Bingo card template
Handout 2
Further ideas for making digital nature collages
Description of each phase / part of the activityDurationThe role of the trainerThe role of the participantsRequirements
Ice breaker/ Nature bingo
Preparation: Create a “Nature Bingo” card for each participant, featuring a grid of images or names of common natural elements, such as flowers, leaves, trees, or insects. Make sure each card has a unique arrangement of items.

Instructions: Provide each participant with a Nature Bingo card and a pen or marker. Explain that they will walk around the outdoor location, looking for the items on their card. When they find an item, they should cross it off their card.

Pairing up: Encourage elderly participants to pair up with younger ones to search for the items together. This fosters intergenerational communication and collaboration.

Goal: The goal of the game is to find enough items to make a horizontal, vertical, or diagonal line on the card, similar to traditional bingo. The first person or pair to complete a line should shout “Nature Bingo!” to signal their success.

Sharing: After the icebreaker, have participants share their findings and experiences with the group. This creates an opportunity for social interaction and can help participants feel more connected and comfortable with each other before starting the nature collage activity.
30 minutes
The trainer’s role in Nature Bingo is to facilitate the activity and encourage interaction among participants. They begin by explaining the game rules and distributing the Nature Bingo cards to the participants. The trainer then guides the participants through the outdoor location, ensuring they have enough time to search for items and complete their cards. Finally, the trainer leads the sharing and discussion phase, allowing participants to talk about their experiences and fostering a sense of connection and camaraderie within the group.

Participants are responsible for actively searching for the natural items on their cards and working collaboratively with their partners. They also engage in sharing their findings and experiences with the group during the discussion phase, fostering social interaction and intergenerational connections.

Nature Bingo cards (Create unique bingo cards for each participant, featuring a grid of images or names of common natural elements (e.g., flowers, leaves, trees, insects). Ensure each card has a different arrangement of items, pens and markers

Main activity/ Nature Collage

The activity is divided into 3 sections

1. Walk and collection
Walk and collection (45-90 min.): Allocate time for the walk or hike and the collection of natural materials. This duration can be adjusted depending on the participants’ mobility, the size of the outdoor location, and the variety of materials available.

2. Digital collage creation
Provide sufficient time for participants to learn how to use the scanning app, scan their collected items, and create digital collages using a photo editing or collage app. This duration may vary depending on the participants’ familiarity with digital tools and their creativity. (90-180 min)

3. Sharing and discussion
Reserve time at the end of the activity for participants to share their digital collages, discuss their inspirations, and engage in a group discussion (30-45 min.)

3-6 hoursThe teacher’s role is to facilitate the overall experience and provide guidance throughout the process. They start by explaining the activity’s objectives and introducing the necessary digital tools, such as scanning and photo editing apps. The teacher assists participants during the nature walk and the digital collage creation, ensuring everyone feels comfortable and included. Finally, the teacher leads the sharing and discussion phase, allowing participants to present their collages and fostering a sense of connection and camaraderie within the group.Participants actively engage in the creative process by collecting natural materials during the nature walk and collaborating with their partners to share ideas and experiences. They learn new digital kills by using scanning and photo editing apps to create their unique digital collages. Participants also present their completed collages to the group, discussing their inspirations and artistic choices. Lastly, they take part in group discussions and reflect on the skills gained and connections made during the activity.


accessible outdoor location with a variety of natural elements for participants to collect, smartphones or tablets equipped with user-friendly scanning and photo editing apps to create digital collages, bags or containers for gathering materials, as well as clear instructions and guidance throughout the activity.

Digital collage creation


During the digital collage creation phase it’s essential to support and guide participants through the process, especially for those who may be less familiar with digital tools. So that is why it needs further description. We provide a detailed breakdown of the steps:

1. Introduce the scanning app: Begin by demonstrating how to use the selected scanning app (e.g., Adobe Scan, Microsoft Office Lens, or CamScanner) on the smartphones or tablets. Show participants how to capture images of the natural materials they’ve collected and save them to their devices.

2. Provide assistance: Pair elderly participants with younger ones, allowing them to learn from each other and offer support as needed. Encourage the younger participants to teach and guide their elderly partners through the scanning process.

3. Introduce the photo editing or collage app: Once the images are scanned, introduce the selected photo editing or collage app (e.g., Canva, Adobe Photoshop Express). Explain its features and functions, demonstrating how to create digital collages using the scanned images.

4. Collaborative creation: Encourage participants to collaborate on their digital collages, discussing their ideas and inspirations as they arrange the scanned images in their desired layout. Provide support and assistance as needed, ensuring everyone feels comfortable using the app.

5. Time management: Monitor the progress of the participants and adjust the time allocation accordingly. If some participants finish early, encourage them to help others or experiment with additional features and tools within the app.

6. Encourage creativity: Remind participants that there is no “right” or “wrong” way to create their digital collages. Encourage them to explore their creativity and express their personal styles and perspectives through their designs.
90 – 180 minutesThe teacher’s role is to introduce and demonstrate the use of scanning and photo editing or collage apps, ensuring participants understand the features and functions. They provide assistance and support to participants as they create their digital collages, answering questions and offering guidance when needed. The teacher also encourages collaboration and creativity among participants, fostering a positive and inclusive atmosphere throughout the process.

Elderly participants actively engage in learning new digital skills, using the scanning app to capture images of their collected natural materials and collaborating with their partners in using the photo editing or collage app to create unique digital collages. They also share their ideas, inspirations, and experiences with fellow participants, contributing to the overall creative process and fostering intergenerational connections.

N/A
Activity 8 - “E-Café for seniors”
Activity topic: Bridging the technological generation gap
AbstractThe objective of the ‘e-café for seniors’ is to reduce the technological divide between young and elderly people and to enhance the sense of inclusion, belonging and connectivity.
Aims / Objectives– Bringing young and older people closer by creating an opportunity for knowledge and skills exchange, while learning the instant messaging platform WhatsApp.
– Reduce the technological divide between young and elderly people
– Enhance the sense of inclusion, belonging and connectivity.
Topics / Skills coveredSeniors will learn and improve their ability to use WhatsApp
Educators or youth will develop a strong bond with seniors as a result of teaching them either in pairs or in small groups, allowing them to get to know each other well.
Target groupSuitable for 4-8 seniors,1-2 young people (18-30 years old), and adult educators.
DurationOnce a week for 1.5 – 2 hours
Venue
A medium-sized venue or room equipped with computers, laptops, and smartphones
RequirementsSmartphone, the printed form of a step-by-step guide explaining each week’s learning, handouts.
User friendly digital tools usedWhatsApp (https://www.whatsapp.com/).
Suggested resources– How to use WhatsApp: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjVlDYu6erU
– How to use WhatsApp: A step-by-step beginner’s guide: https://www.androidauthority.com/how-to-use-whatsapp-1097088/
Fernandez, N., (2023). – How to use WhatsApp: A step-by-step beginner’s guide. Android Authority: General Technology. Available at: https://www.androidauthority.com/how-to-use-whatsapp-1097088/
Insider Tech. (2020, October 30). How To Use WhatsApp (2022) [Video]. YouTube.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjVlDYu6erU
Handout 1
Icebreaker Activity “One Truth, Two Lies”
Handout 2
Suggest Topic Ideas for What’s App Weekly Lessons
Description of each phase / part of the activityDurationThe role of the trainerThe role of the participantsRequirements
Welcome
Participants are welcome to the venue. The trainers introduce themselves, give a brief tour of the venue and asked participants to take a seat. Tea or coffee is offered. Each participant has a chance to introduce themselves via the ‘‘One Truth, Two Lies’’ icebreaker activity.
5 minutes
Welcome participants to the venueTo follow the lead of the educators and get familiar with the venueCoffee, Tea, Water or some snacks
Icebreaker
”One Truth, Two Lies”
Participants will form a circle and the trainer will start the icebreaker activity by telling one truth and two lies for themselves (e.g., My name is Maria (truth), I am 25 years old (lie), when I was young, I wanted to be a professional ice-skater (lie)). Then the other participants take turns and justify which sentence seems to them like a lie or truth. After all, participants said their predictions, the trainer will disclose the true sentence, and the participant who correctly identify the two lies will take the turn and present his/her three sentences of truth and lies. Examples of sentences can be any fun fact about one’s life or basic information. Examples of sentences can be found in Handout 1.
15 minutes
Guide the activityIntroduce themselves and get to know the other participants as well as the trainerN/A
Main Activity – The activities will be divided into separate meetings.
**Keep in mind that the topic of each training week differs**
The educator describes briefly the training program and the activities included. Then the educator outlines the benefits of this activity and presents in more detail the training that will follow on the specific course day. For more ideas on topics that can be taught see Handout 2. Keep in mind that the intergenerational aspect of this activity can be ensured only if seniors and young people complete the activities in pairs or in small groups of one trainer and a maximum of 4 seniors. By doing that, they will have the chance of getting to know each other well and build a strong bond
1 hour– Guide the activity, teach, give a small presentation and explain WhatsApp to seniors.
– Learn how older people used to communicate before instant messaging apps and the internet
– Learn to use post stamps to send a physical letter via the post
– Answer questions.
– Get to know the strong and weak abilities of each senior.
– Participate in the activity.
– Young people will help seniors to learn how to install WhatsApp on their phone and learn about its functionalities
– Young people will help seniors to learn how to send an instant message and (video)call someone on WhatsApp
– Seniors will teach young people how to send a physical letter, explain how they were communicating before and present the history behind any collectible post stamp.
Smartphones
Reflection Time
A trainer should briefly summarize the training that happened that day and its benefits. Then seniors and young people will have the chance to reflect on what was difficult/easy to learn and practice, and why. Then they should describe additional ways they can apply what they have learned in their daily lives and how this will benefit them. In addition, they can also reflect and evaluate how was the general experience of spending time together and exchanging knowledge. Any feedback, comments, and questions are always encouraged and welcome. Before the end of the training, a printed guide with step-by-step explanations of the entire WhatsApp lesson taught that day should be given to seniors for revision and for being able to use it whenever they need to recall training information. Seniors and young people should be thanked for their time spent and be reminded of the next training time, day, and place
15 minutes– Guide the activity and solve any inquiries. Make sure everyone feels encouraged to give some feedback.

– Reflect on their experience, understand the importance of this activity and what needs to be improved
Reflect on their experience, understand the importance of this activity, and provide feedback on what needs to be improvedA printed form of a step-by-step guide explaining each week’s learnings(seniors)

A printed form of the lesson cultural output (educators or youth)
Activity 9 - “Upgrading – Wisdom Exchange’ workshop”
Activity topic: Bridging the technological generation gap
AbstractSeniors have all life wisdom due to their lifelong experiences whereas young people have all wisdom regarding new technologies and their uses. In the workshops an ‘exchange of wisdom’ will happen were on the first half of the workshop an open discussion related to the lesson’s topic will take place followed on the other half of the lesson which will be associated to a Facebook’s functionality. For example, seniors will be taught how to upload photos and posts on their wall. Then an open discussion related to memories, life experiences, and secrets for a better quality of life can be shared from generation to generation. The ‘Wisdom Exchange’ activity can be beneficial for both parties since it ensures social inclusion and connectivity for seniors and take the form of a motivator for youngsters.
Aims / ObjectivesThis activity aims to foster seniors’ digital skills, and enhance their technical knowledge in order to make their life easier and simultaneously promote insightful discussion that will bring young people closer to old traditions, values, beliefs, attitudes, and ways of thinking.
Topics / Skills coveredSeniors will learn to use the online platform Facebook
Young people will learn: a) about the importance of close relationships and family, b) about the values and principles of the older generations, and they will also exchange memories and life experiences.
Target groupSuitable for 10 seniors, 5 young people (18-30 years old), and adult educators
DurationOnce a week for 2 hours
Venue
Medium size room or venue with computers or laptops
RequirementsComputers, laptops, smartphones, a printed form of the icebreaker activity, a printed form of a step-by-step guide explaining each week’s learning for both youngsters and seniors
User friendly digital tools usedFacebook
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.facebook.katana&hl=en_US&pli=1
Suggested resources– How to Teach Facebook to Seniors: https://www.wikihow.com/Teach-Facebook-to-Seniors
– Facebook for Seniors, Grandparents & Boomers FREE Short Video Course & Preview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVy6q2JHfKU
– Home – Facebook: A Web Tutorial: https://sites.google.com/site/facebooktutorialforseniors/
– 2021. How to Teach Facebook to Seniors. Wiki How. Available at: https://www.wikihow.com/Teach-Facebook-to-Seniors#References
– MVVP TV. (2016, January 28). Facebook for Seniors, Grandparents & Boomers FREE Short Video Course & Preview [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVy6q2JHfKU
Handout 1
My Life Pie Chart
Handout 2
Topic Ideas for Wisdom Exchange Weekly Workshops
Description of each phase / part of the activityDurationThe role of the trainerThe role of the participantsRequirements
Welcome
Participants are welcome to the venue. The trainers introduce themselves, give a brief tour of the venue and asked participants to take a seat. Tea or coffee is offered. Each participant has a chance to introduce themselves via the ‘‘My Life Pie Chart’’ icebreaker activity.
5 minutes
Welcome participants to the venue To follow the lead of the educators and get familiar with the venue Coffee, Tea, Water, or some snacks
Icebreaker
“My Life Pie Chart”
Each individual should draw a pie chart of his/her life with percentages of time spent on significant things in their life. It doesn’t have to be exact. For example, 20% sleeping, 10% eating, 40% working, 5% gardening, 5% traveling, and 20% family time. Ask everyone to share with the others their pie chart. A printed form of the Pie Chart can be found in Handout 1.
15 minutes
Guide the activityIntroduce themselves and get to know the other participants as well as the trainerColour pencils and printed paper with the pie chart
Topic Introduction
**Keep in mind that the topic of each training week differs**
The educator describes briefly the training program and the activities included. Then the educator outlines the benefits of this activity.
Afterward, it encourages participants to take 2 minutes and think of:
a. Week 1 – Their favorite traditional phrases and their meaning
b. Week 2 – The three most important people in their life
c. Week 3 – Key life memories and experiences
15 minutesExplain the purpose of the lesson and its benefitsParticipate in the activity and think of a traditional element based on the topicA brief presentation for better visualization
Main Activity – The activities will be divided into separate meetings.

First part – Seniors will be introduced to the lesson’s topic. A brief presentation with a demonstration of the Facebook feature or function related to the lesson’s topics will be presented. Then seniors always guided and assisted by the educators will be instructed to implement what they will learn in real life.

Second part – A short discussion will be held related to the lesson’s topic. Seniors and young people or adult educators will be able to engage in an insightful idea and opinion-sharing session within a safe environment.
On Handout 2, there are suggestions for each week’s topics
1 hour– Guide the activity, teach, give a small presentation, explain Facebook to seniors, and answer questions.
– Get to know the strong and weak abilities of each senior.
– Learn about traditional phrases and their meaning or phrases that are not of use today.
– Learn about the importance of close relationships, values, and principles of the older generations
– Learn about older generations’ life experiences, memories, and life secrets.
– Participate in the activity.
– Seniors will learn various functionalities of Facebook
– Seniors will share their generational experiences and life lessons with the trainer or young people.
Computers, Laptops, Smartphones
Reflection Time

A trainer should briefly summarize the training that happened that day and its benefits. Then seniors and young people will have the chance to reflect on what was difficult/easy to learn and practice, and why. Then they should describe additional ways they can apply what they have learned in their daily lives and how this will benefit them. In addition, they can also reflect and evaluate how was the general experience of spending time with each other and exchanging knowledge. Any feedback, comments, and questions are always encouraged and welcome. Before the end of the training a printed guide with step-by-step explanations of the entire Facebook lesson taught that day should be given to seniors for revision and for being able to use it whenever they need to recall training information. Seniors and young people should be thanked for their time spent and be reminded of the next training time, day, and place.
15 minutes– Guide the activity and solve any inquires
– Reflect on their experience, understand the importance of this activity and what needs to be improved.
Reflect on their experience, understand the importance of this activity and what needs to be improvedA printed form of a step-by-step guide explaining each week’s learning for seniors
Activity 10 - “Travel the world with culinary highlights”
Activity topic: Healthy lifestyle/ Food & cooking
AbstractFood and cooking bring different cultures together. Different cuisines are packed with nutrients and minerals that you may not find in your usual food, and this can contribute to a more balanced diet to make you feel healthy and happy. If you try new, healthy, food, you’ll introduce more positive nutrition for your body. You’ll get the natural benefits of food items – fruits, vegetables, and grains, without relying on supplements. It also improves your immune system!
Aims / ObjectivesIntroduce new foods and recipes that can support with the creation of a balanced diet.
Stimulate an intergenerational discussion on food and nutrition.
Topics / Skills coveredLearn new cooking skills and discover new digital tools where you can learn new cooking skills and recipes that are suitable for all generations.
Target groupSuitable for intergenerational activities, both youth and seniors. The minimum age of participating youth is 15 years old. The recommended number of participants is 20 (5 groups of 4 people).
DurationApproximate duration is 1,5 – 2 hours including preparation and discussion. However, time may vary with the chosen recipes.
Venue
Kitchen with cooking equipment; ingredients for recipes, handouts, allergy restrictions from participants; sticky notes
RequirementsInternet, cooking ingredients as per recipe and kitchen utensils.
User friendly digital tools usedYouTube
This digital tool can provide anyone with recipes and how to make them! The tool provides a wide variety of videos uploaded by its users or organizations which can be a source of information and show users a demonstration on how to do something (such as cook a recipe or do exercises in relation to healthy lifestyle). Further the tool can be accessed on any kind of device that has an internet connection – phone, laptop, Ipad.
My Fitness Pal as a multilingual alternative
An application where you can monitor your calorie intake, macros and weight. You can get nutrition insights and get custom macro tracking. You can also find recipes, workouts, your friends or a community for inspiration.
Suggested resourcesImpact of aging on eating behaviors, food choices, nutrition, and health status. (2001). PubMed. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11426286/
M. Short, M. Horhota, K. Blomquist, K. St.Hilaire, Psychology, Furman University, Greenville, South Carolina, 23 October 2015, FOOD, CULTURE AND AGING: A STUDY OF OLDER ADULTS’ SOURCES OF KNOWLEDGE AND HEALTHY EATING BEHAVIORS, https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/gnv569.17
Link to the ‘Healthy Living Guide 2023-2024’ by Harvard:
https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2024/01/HLGuide2023-2024.pdf
Handout 1
Roll the dice
Handout 2
Spin the Wheel
Description of each phase / part of the activityDurationThe role of the trainerThe role of the participantsRequirements
Icebreakers
The participants are welcomed, coffee and tea are made available, they take a seat. They become seated and a presentation is projected. The tutor is introducing themselves and gives the opportunity to the participants to introduce themselves. The tutor can make use of the ‘Roll the Dice’ Ice breaker to ask the questions to the participants.

15 – 20 minutes
Facilitate icebreaking activityParticipate in ice breaking activityN/A
Teambuilding activities / Brainstorming session
The tutor explains the aims of the activity and the upcoming tasks for the remaining time. The tutor can split the participants into groups if possible. Groups discuss the cuisine they would like to explore together. They can use the Spin the Wheel handout to choose or alternatively the tutor can present some meal options based on the ingredients they have purchased and let groups decide what to do with them.
5 minutes
Support with explaining different recipes Agree together on what they are going to make N/A
Main activities: Travel the world with culinary highlights
Preparation of a meal based on a culture from the ‘Spin the wheel’ or from a chosen one by the participants upon availability of ingredients.
The participants are provided with time to prepare their meal. During the preparation time, they are being asked to also get to know each other, their background, what their favourite cuisine is and why. The tutor can present a set of questions that the participants can discuss while their meals are in the oven for example. Hereby a list of questions that may be used: What is the meal that you cook most often at home? Do you like to exchange ideas with others about recipes? And if yes, with whom? Who is the best chef in your family? Why?If you were to eat the same meal every day, which meal would that be? Have you travelled abroad and if yes which cuisine stood out to you and why? If you were to teach one recipe to your loved one, which recipe would you like to pass along? What is the longest time you have spent in the kitchen making a meal?
1 hourSupport with the activity and with getting to know the participantsWork together on a common goal and get to know each other’s backgrounds;
Gain knowledge of healthy recipes and cuisines;
Exchange intergenerational knowledge of cooking and healthy lifestyle.
N/A
Digital tools presentation
Participants present the meals they have prepared and can try the different meals from the different cuisines. They are also adviced to share with the rest of the group how they found the cuisine and recipe (and which digital tools they used). Afterwards the tutor presents different digital tools they can make use of to be inspired by new healthy recipes and give a demonstration of how they can make use of them.
15 minutesFacilitate the presentation of different meals and present the group with new digital tools Facilitate the presentation of different meals and present the group with new digital tools N/A
Reflection time
Participants are asked to reflect on how this activity was for them. They are asked to write on a sticky note at least one Tip for the trainer and at least one Top on their experience of this workshop. In addition, the participants are asked to also share their experience on how it was to spend time together in this intergenerational activity – what they have learned from each other and what new skills they have acquired.
15 minutesProvide room for feedback, listen openly and make notes for future activitiesProvide feedback and reflect on the activity: what they learned, enjoyed and what can be improvedN/A
Activity 11 - “Making a cookbook together!”
Activity topic: Healthy lifestyle/ Food & cooking
AbstractCollaborate with friends and loved ones to create your heritage cookbook. When you make your own cookbook, you have full creative control. You can decide what recipes you publish, what photos you use, and how everything is laid out, as well as what type of cookbook binding you want- anything from a cookbook binder to a plastic coil recipe book. If you have a specific vision for a cookbook, this is the best way to achieve it. It’s so satisfying to hold your own cookbook in your hands, knowing that (unintended) your hard work creating recipes has paid off. Who doesn’t love cooking? There’s something therapeutic about the process, especially as you’re making delicious food for yourself or your loved ones. Finding good cooking activities for elderly people doesn’t need to be difficult either. There are always some enjoyable things they can do in the kitchen, even if they don’t have the same energy and ability that they once did. During this intergenerational activity, the participants will also become acquainted with digital tools.
Aims / ObjectivesCollection of intergenerational recipes and formation of an intergenerational DIY cookbook
Exchange of perspectives and experiences between generations on the topic of food and cooking
Topics / Skills coveredDiscussions on how to create a cookbook, what it needs to include and how we are going to shape it.
Stimulating intergenerational discussion on the content of such a cookbook.
Target groupSuitable for intergenerational activities, both youth and seniors. The minimum age of participating youth is 15 years old. The recommended number of participants is 20 (5 groups of 4 people).
Duration2 hours
Venue
Classroom with seating area
RequirementsHandouts, pen and paper, printer.
User friendly digital tools usedHealthy Recipes applications, using Healthy Recipe Book: FitMe as an example in Apple Store and Recipe book : Healthy recipes in Google store as a similar alternative. This kind of digital tools (applications) can help you with creating a healthier lifestyle through getting inspirations for healthy recipes. You can get tips and search for recipes depending on what you like or ingredients you have. You can also get (in some apps) offline recipe access and videos.
iEatWell: Healthy Food Diary
This digital tool (application) can allow you to be tracking your food intake & give you food insights. It provides an overview of the users eating habits. It allows users to put in their own recipes and track how they feel after their meal.
Suggested resourcesMatheny, K. G. (2020). No mere culinary curiosities: using historical cookbooks in the library classroom. Matheny | RBM: A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage. https://rbm.acrl.org/index.php/rbm/article/view/24707/32534#:~:text=As%20artifact%2C%20cookbooks%20illustrate%20aspects,groups%20both%20contemporary%20and%20historical,
Link to Harvard website regarding ‘Healthy Eating Plate’: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/healthy-eating-plate/
Link to Harvard website regarding the importance of Fruits and Vegetables: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/vegetables-and-fruits/#:~:text=A%20diet%20rich%20in%20vegetables,help%20keep%20appetite%20in%20check

Handout 1
Roll the dice
Handout 2
My favourite recipe
Handout 3
Recipe book
Description of each phase / part of the activityDurationThe role of the trainerThe role of the participantsRequirements
Icebreaker
The participants are welcomed, coffee and tea are made available, they take a seat. They become seated and a presentation is projected. The tutor is introducing themselves and gives the opportunity to the participants to introduce themselves. The tutor can make use of the ‘Roll the Dice’ Ice breaker to ask the questions to the participants.
15 – 20 minutes
Facilitate icebreaking activityParticipate in ice breaking activityN/A
Making a Recipe book together
The tutor explains the aims of this activity and the upcoming tasks for the remaining time.
The tutor can explains the benefits of this activity:
– Creative aspect to cooking. This is a fantastic way to stimulate a senior’s mind.
– Sense of purpose. Heritage of recipes
– Mood booster – Decreases stress, triggers memories, boosts appetite, encourages inventiveness, helps with depression
– Exchange of recipes
– Social aspect – keeping them socially conscious
10 minutes
Present the aims of the activity of the day Gain knowledge of what aim of this activity is and the required tasks are. Also become aware of the benefits resulting from participation in this activity; finally put the acquired knowledge and skills into practice. N/A
My favourite recipe
Each participant is asked to make use of handout 1 and write down in short, their favourite recipe.

Afterwards the tutor sets up rules. Each participant is to share their favourite recipe in short. This way recipes can be grouped together per topic for example for the creation of the cook book. Afterwards the tutor can split the groups per topic – Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner and further within these groups to meals and desserts for example. Once the split is created the sub-groups start discussing together how they would like their section to look like. Do they want to provide pictures of their recipes or do they want to keep it only to text. They begin to work together to write out the recipe in a friendly way for the readers.
20 minutes
Present handout 1 and provide link to the participants.
Set up the workflow / rules of the activity and
Work together on a common goal and get to know each other’s backgrounds;
Gain knowledge of healthy recipes and cuisines;
Exchange intergenerational knowledge of cooking and healthy lifestyle.
N/A
Making a Recipe book together
The participants are provided with time to prepare the recipes in writing and collect pictures where possible. They are also allowed to use the internet for pictures if they do not have any themselves and if it is applicable. They are asked to fill in the canva template presented as handout 2 to write out their recipes. In this way they work together through the use of a digital tool to create a cook book. During the preparation time, they are being asked to also get to know each other, their background, what their favourite cuisine is and why. The tutor can present a set of questions that the participants can discuss while their meals are in the oven for example. Hereby a set of questions that may be used: What is the meal that you cook most often at home?
Do you like to exchange ideas with others about recipes? And if yes, with whom? Who is the best chef in your family? Why? If you were to eat the same meal every day, which meal would that be? Have you travelled abroad and if yes which cuisine stood out to you and why?
45 minutesFacilitate the usage of Canva as a digital tool which can be used for creating a Recipe book Exchange cultural knowledge and recipes make use of Canva as a digital tool to create a cook book; Exchange intergenerational knowledge of cooking and healthy lifestyle.N/A
Digital tools presentation
Participants have a look at their final product. They all receive a link to the new Recipe book or if they want the tutor can print a copy for them. Afterwards the tutor can present other different digital tools they can make use of or be inspired by new healthy recipes and give a demonstration of how they can make use of them.
15 minutes
Facilitate the different Recipe book distribution and Present the group with new digital tools Obtain knowledge of different recipes and knowledge of other digital tools that can be used for the purpose of healthy eating.N/A
Reflection time
Participants are asked to reflect on how this activity was for them. They are asked to write on a sticky note at least one Tip for the trainer and at least one Top on their experience of this workshop. In addition, the participants are asked to also share their experience on how it was to spend time together in this intergenerational activity – what they have learned from each other and what new skills they have acquired.
15 minutesProvide room for feedback, listen openly and make notes for future activitiesProvide feedback and reflect on the activity: what they learned, enjoyed and what can be improvedN/A
Activity 12 - “How My Town has Changed”
Activity topic: Traditions, norms, customs
AbstractThis activity aims to explore the changes that have occurred in our town over the years through intergenerational activities involving seniors. By engaging seniors and younger generations, we aim to foster understanding, promote social cohesion, and document the town’s transformation.
Aims / Objectives-Document and showcase the historical and cultural changes in our town.
-Promote intergenerational connections and understanding between seniors and younger generations.
-Preserve the collective memory of the town’s residents.
-Enhance social cohesion and community engagement.
Topics / Skills covered-Local history and heritage.
-Photograph.
-Digital literacy and media editing.
-Community engagement and communication skills
Target group-Seniors (aged 60 and above).
-Younger generations (students, community members aged between 18 and 25, etc.).
DurationOnce a week for 1.5 – 2 hours
Venue
Activities can take place in various locations within the town, including community centers, schools, libraries and museums.
Requirements-Audiovisual recording equipment (e.g., cameras, microphones, smartphones).
-Internet access for research and online resources.
User friendly digital tools used-Digital cameras or smartphones for capturing images and videos.
-Online platforms for sharing and showcasing activity outcomes.
-Mentimeter (https://www.mentimeter.com)
Mentimeter provides visual representation of data, which can make complex information easier to understand.
-Padlet (https://padlet.com/)
It’s a great tool for collaborative brainstorming and sharing content.
-Kahoot (https://kahoot.com/)
It allows you to create quizzes and interactive games to engage your audience.
-Mural (https://www.mural.co/)
It can be used for design thinking and brainstorming activities.
-Canva (https://www.canva.com/)
It can be used to incorporate interactive elements in designs.
-Snapedit (https://snapedit.app/es)
Remove people, remove objects from photo faster with AI technology.
Suggested resourcesLocal history books, archives, and resources.
-González, M. (2010). Historia de Nuestra Ciudad. Ediciones Locales
-Archivo Histórico Nacional. (2022). Colecciones y Documentos. https://www.archivohistorico.es/coleciones
-Sánchez, A. (2021, Enero 20). Explorando la Historia Local. Sociedad de Historia Local. https://www.historiaoral.org/guia-metodos
-Smith, J. (2005). History of Our Town. Local Publishing.
Oral history guides and interview questionnaires.
-Instituto de Historia Oral. (2019). Guía de Historia Oral: Métodosy Técnicas. https://www.historiaoral.org/guia-metodos
Photography and video tutorials.
-Photography School. (2022). Introduction to Portrait
-Photography. https://www.photographyschool.com/tutorials/intro-to-portrait-photography
Online platforms for accessing historical maps and images.
-Mapas Históricos en Línea. (2020). Explora Nuestra Colección. https://www.mapashistoricosenlinea.es/explora
Community engagement guides and resources.
-Pérez, L. (2018). Participación Comunitaria: Guía Práctica.
https://www.participacioncomunitaria.es/guias/guia-practica

Handout 1
Cuenca Poetry 1983. Storytelling activity.
Handout 2
Example of old photos of Cuenca. Compare old and new photos. How your town has changed?
Handout 3
My town. Questions to facilitate a discussion on the significance of preserving local history and the importance of intergenerational collaboration.
Description of each phase / part of the activityDurationThe role of the trainerThe role of the participantsRequirements
IntroductiontotheActivity:
· Provide a brief overview of the activity and its objectives.
· Explain the importance of intergenerational collaboration and the value of documenting local changes through photography.

Note: the duration of each segment can be adjusted based on the group dynamics and the pace of the activity. It is essential to create a supportive and inclusive environment that values the contributions of all participants and encourages meaningful dialoguebetween different generations.
15 minutes
Moderates a discussion. Participate in a discussion.N/A
Explanation:
· Divide participants into intergenerational pairs (one older adult and one younger participant).
· They should have old photograph or graphic documents; they should explain them to each other.
· Provide each pair with a disposable camera or smartphone with a camera app.
· Encourage them to focus on landmarks, buildings, public spaces, or any other areas. that have undergone significant transformations.
20 minutes
Explain that their task is to explore the town together and capture photographs that depict how the town has changed over time.Decide what could be most interesting to identify changes.N/A
Warm-up/Energizer:
using e.g. Mentimeter. Conduct a brief warm-up activity to foster interaction and connection between the intergenerational pairs.

10 minutes
– The trainer starts by sharing a very brief memorable story (Handout 1), related to their town or community (2-3 minutes).
– After sharing the story, the trainer invites participants to use Mentimeter to respond to a single open-ended question related to the story or the town. For example, “What’s a memorable experience you’ve had in your town?” Participants can use their smartphones or other devices to send/ give their responses in real-time.
– Participants have 2-3 minutes to enter their responses into Mentimeter.
– The trainer displays the responses on the screen in a word cloud or list format using Mentimeter.
– The trainer facilitates a brief discussion based on the responses, inviting a few participants to share additional details or anecdotes (2-3 minutes).
– The trainer concludes the warm-up by summarizing key themes and thanking participants for their contributions (1-2 minutes).

Write ideas on their smartphones using Mentimeter toolTablets or smartphones; projector. (Handouts 1& 2).
Photography Exploration:
Allow the intergenerational pairs to venture out into the town to explore and capture photographs.

60 minutesEncourage them to engage in conversations and share their perspectives on the changes they observe. Emphasize the importance of storytelling through the photographs, capturing both personal and collective memories.Take photographsMobile phone, camera & Handout 2.
Group Discussion and Reflection:
gather all participants and provide a space for sharing and reflection.
Each intergenerational pair can present a selection of their photographs and describe the changes they captured.

30 minutes
– Encourage participants to share their thoughts, emotions, and personal connections to the town’s transformations.
– Facilitate a discussion on the significance of preserving local history and the importance of intergenerational collaboration.

Participate in a discussion and share ideas.Projector. (Handout 3)
Evaluation Methods:
Conclude the activity by evaluating the experience and learning outcomes.

10 minutes· Summarizes the activity. Provide participants with feedback forms or facilitate a group discussion to gather their thoughts on the activity’s effectiveness, what they learned, and any suggestions for improvement.Share feedback and comments.
Evaluate the activity.
Digital forms
Activity 13 - “Cuenca Holly Week Poster”
Activity topic: Traditions, norms, customs
AbstractThe Semana Santa (Holy Week) in Cuenca, Spain, is a significant cultural event known for its elaborate processions and religious traditions. This intergenerational activity aims to foster understanding and appreciation of Semana Santa by creating posters that showcase its essence. Participants will collaborate in pairs, combining their generational perspectives, creativity, and digital tools to design visually appealing posters that capture the spirit of this cultural event.
Aims / Objectives1. Promote intergenerational collaboration and understanding.
2. Encourage appreciation of Semana Santa in Cuenca and its cultural significance.
3. Enhance creative thinking and visual communication skills.
4. Utilize user-friendly digital tools for poster design.
Topics / Skills covered· Semana Santa traditions and symbolism in Cuenca.
· Collaboration and communicationskills.
· Creative thinking and design principles.
· Digital tools for poster creation.
Target groupThis activity is suitable for participants of different ages, ideally involving intergenerational pairs (one older adult and one younger participant between 18 and 24 years old to encourage exchange of perspectives and knowledge.
DurationThe activity can be completed within 2-3 hours, depending on the complexity of the posters and the level of interaction.
Venue
Computer room with access to digital tools (computers, tablets, or smartphones) and printing facilities, if desired.
Requirements· Digital devices (computers, tablets, or smartphones) with internet access and appropriate design software or online tools.
· Art supplies (paper, markers, colored pencils, etc.) for sketching and initial design.
· Optional: Printer for printing final posters.
User friendly digital tools used· Canva: A user-friendly online graphic design tool with pre-made templates and customizable elements. (www.canva.com)
· Adobe Spark: An intuitive online platform for creating graphics, videos, and web pages. (https://blog.adobe.com/en/topics/spark)
· Piktochart: A web-based infographic and presentation tool for visually engaging designs. (https://piktochart.com)
Suggested resources· Each year’s Holy Week Cuenca poster, information materials, including images and videos
· Examples of Semana Santa posters or related artwork for inspiration. https://www.juntacofradiascuenca.es/
· Design and composition tips for creating visually appealing posters.TheFutur. (2023, August 28). Poster Design Tips and Techniques. [Video]. YouTube.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yourvideourl
Handout 1
Warm-up activity to energize and connect the participants
Handout 2
HollyWeek Poster
Description of each phase / part of the activityDurationThe role of the trainerThe role of the participantsRequirements
Introduction to the Activity:
start by introducing the activity and explaining its purpose, which is to create a poster that represents Semana Santa (Holy Week).

Note: Adjust the duration of each segment as needed based on the group dynamics and the pace of the activity. It is important to create a supportive and inclusive environment that values the contributions of all participants and fosters intergenerational understanding and collaboration.
15 minutes
Provide a brief overview of Semana Santa and its significance in the local culture or community.Emphasize the importance of intergenerational collaboration and the value of sharing different perspectives and experiences.

Participate in a discussion.N/A
Warm-up/Energizer:
conduct a short warm-up activity to energize and connect the participants.
This can include a simple icebreaker game using the Mentimeter.
10 minutes
Activity: “Group Semana Santa Storytelling”
Instructions:
1. Divide the participants into smaller groups (3-5 people per group, depending on the group size).
2. Provide each group with a random starting sentence for a story related to the Semana Santa. This sentence can be as simple as “Once upon a time…” or something more specific.
3. Each group has to continue the story, with each participant adding one sentence at a time. They should go in a circle, with each person adding a sentence to the story.
4. Set a timer for 5-7 minutes, during which each group continues to build their story.
5. When the timer goes off, each group selects one person to share their story with the larger group.
6. After each group has shared their story, have a brief discussion about the different stories, what themes emerged, and any surprises or creative elements.

Write ideas on their smartphones using Mentimeter toolHandout 1, laptops, tablets or smartphones; projector
Explanation of tasks:
– Divide participants into intergenerational pairs or small groups.
– Sharing Personal Memories, facilitate a guided discussion on the significance of preserving Semana Santa traditions and the role of intergenerational collaboration in passing down cultural heritage.
– Explain that their task is to create a collaborative poster that visually represents Semana Santa.
.

20 minutes
Encourage participants to discuss and incorporate various elements of Semana Santa, such as processions, religious symbols, traditional attire, or local customs.
Copyright: Each image will be allowed to be used in the poster-making process .
Describe their family customs and traditions.Describe their family customs and traditions.
Poster Creation: allow the intergenerational pairs or groups to work together to create their Semana Santa poster.

Steps:
· Research and Gathering: Collect information about Cuenca Holy Week, including traditions, symbols, and events.
· Conceptualization: Brainstorm ideas for the poster, considering key elements that represent the essence of Holy Week in Cuenca.
· Sketching: Create initial sketches to plan the layout and composition of the poster.
· Feedback Session: Share sketches with peers for feedback and suggestions.
· Refinement: Incorporate feedback into the final poster design, paying attention to details and accuracy.
· Coloring: Add color to the poster, considering the symbolism of different colors in the context of Holy Week.
· Final Touches: Fine-tune details, add any additional elements, and make sure the poster effectively communicates the spirit of Cuenca Holy Week.
· Presentation: Display the completed posters in a communal space, allowing participants to appreciate each other’s work and celebrate the collective effort.
60 minutes– Encourage collaboration, creativity, and the sharing of ideas and experiences.
– Provide guidance and support as needed, and ensure that all participants have the opportunity to contribute to the poster.


Design the posterUtilize user-friendly digital tools for poster design. Canva templates as handout 2.
Group Discussion and Reflection:
– Gather all participants together to showcase and discuss the completed posters.
– Each intergenerational pair or group can present their poster and explain the choices they made in representing Semana Santa.
30 minutes
Encourage participants to share their personal connections, memories, and reflections on the significance of Semana Santa.Group discussion on the diverse interpretations and understanding of Semana Santa across generations.Projector
Evaluation Methods:
Conclude the activity by evaluating the experience and learning outcomes.

10 minutesProvide participants with feedback forms or facilitate a group discussion to gather their thoughts on the activity’s effectiveness, what they learned, and any suggestions for improvement.Share feedback and comments.
Evaluate the activity.
Digital forms, such as Google Forms
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